Osprey Atmos 65 vs Aether 60 Comparison

Osprey's Atmos & Aether are two of there most loved backpacks, and for very good reason.

They are highly awarded hiking & backpacking packs that are extremely well thought-out and designed.

There are tonnes of great features on both of these packs, most of them the same or very similar. But, there are also some key differences which I will highlight first in this comparison.

The table below shows you the similarities and differences clearly, and further down I will explain them in detail so you can decide which one of these killer packs is for you.

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OSREY ATMOS vs AETHER COMPARISON

Osprey Atmos 65
Osprey Aether 60

Size (inches)

65L

60L

Weights (lb)

4.67 lb (2.12 kg)


5.0 lb (2.29 kg)


Outside Material

100D and 630D Nylon Dobby

100D and 500D Nylon Dobby

Back System

Anti-Gravity Mesh

Anti-Gravity Mesh

Harness System

Extendable hips

Load lifter biostretch harness​

Adjustable torso length

Mouldable hip belt foam​

Removable Top

Including cover (to protect pack entry)

Yes

Yes

Yes (Also a daypack)

Yes

Bottom Access

Yes

Yes

Side Access

No

Yes (one side)

Zippered Front Pocket

2 side zippers access extra front pocket

No

Side Water Bottle Pockets

2 (with top & front access)

2 (with top & front access)

Separate Bottom Compartment

Yes (can remove divider)

Yes (can remove divider)

Raincover

Yes

Yes

Hydration Pocket & Access

Yes (can remove divider)

Yes (can remove divider)

Front Extra Pocket

Yes - Dual side-zipper access

No

Daylite Pack Compatible

Add on loops for day pack addition

No

Colors

Green, Red, Gray

Green, Blue, Orange


Osprey Atmos & Aether - Main Differences

Osprey Atmos Harness

Osprey Atmos Harness

Osprey Aether Harness

Osprey Aether Harness

The Harness

The harness is one of the biggest areas these two packs differ, so pay close attention :>

The Osprey Atmos has a completely new harness and back mesh system on the 2017 model.

First their is the back mesh which is stretched along the back (all the way down) and also across the hip area. This really helps keep your body away from the backpack and reduce sweat as well as making it really comfy to carry.

The Atmos also has an adjustable ​hip belt (there are little extenders you can pull out up to 6 inches) to custom fit it to people with wider hips.

The length is fully adjustable as well as the way the mesh sits on your shoulders. All in all, the level of adjustment on this pack is pretty impressive.​

The Aether has combined their successful old-school system of an adjustable torso and integrated some of the anti-gravity mesh features you see on the Atmos. There is mesh on the bottom half of the back and hip area. The top half has more padding with airflow holes and mesh. So, this is not as "breathable" as the Atmos. 

Another ​thing to be aware of on the Aether is that the harness is interchangeable to help get you the perfect length and fit. Something that is super-important on such a pack!

The hip belt is also quite old-school BUT it has kept the mouldable foam which can be custom heat moulded to your hips. You need to get yourself into an approved Osprey dealer to get it done, but if you are like me and suffer a lot from pointy hips - hiking for hours with a load can be torture! So, I love this feature.​

But, the old harness system is proven and loved by many in the backpacking community, so if you know it and are comfortable with it, then maybe that is something you want to stick with.

The Top Lid / DayLid Pack (Aether in USA Only)

Both these packs come with the typical Osprey removable top lid. This is another killer feature not found on all brands and comes in real handy.

You can do two great things with this:

  • Lighten your load if you don't need the lid/space on top
  • Use it as a separate pack
Osprey Aether Daylid Pack

Osprey Aether Daylid Pack

In the case of the separate pack use, the Aether wins because not only is the lid removable, but it turns into a daypack too! Hidden inside the lid is a zipper and attachment points. So, you open the zip, get out the small straps, attach them - and good to go.

Oh, and did I mention this pack has decent space inside. There is also a hydration sleeve, bungy cord on the outside (for an ice axe perhaps) and the straps have a nice mesh on them. So, it not just some small cheap backpack :>

The only downside is that this feature clearly adds to the weight of the pack, so if you don't need it...maybe the Atmos is a better bet.

Note: In Europe the Daylid (lid backpack) feature is swapped for a rain cover (according to Osprey on their website)​

Side Zipper (Aether)

Both these packs have top (stuff) access like any backpacking pack worthy of its salt.

The also both have bottom access, as well as separation panels which can give you a separate bottom part for other gear (or you can not use it)

However, only the Aether has a long vertical side access zipper which really helps give you another way to get to your gear. This really saves you digging for your stuff (or pulling it all out and throwing it on the ground! been there) as it gives you mid-level access.

Of course, it is another thing that adds weight to the pack (which is 1/3 lb heaver for less volume).​

Osprey Aether Side Zipper Access

Osprey Aether Side Zipper Access

Dual Front Zipper (Atmos)

Both these packs have top (stuff) access like any backpacking pack worthy of its salt.

The also both have bottom access, as well as separation panels which can give you a separate bottom part for other gear (or you can not use it)

However, only the Aether has a long vertical side access zipper which really helps give you another way to get to your gear. This really saves you digging for your stuff (or pulling it all out and throwing it on the ground! been there) as it gives you mid-level access.

Of course, it is another thing that adds weight to the pack (which is 1/3 lb heaver for less volume).​

Osprey Atmost Dual Front Zippers

Osprey Atmost Dual Front Zippers

Shared Features Worth Highlighting

Although these packs differ in those areas I mentioned above, they also share some other awesome features worth mention:

  • Flapjack Top Cover (so when you remove the lid, your pack is covered/dry)
  • Separate Bottom Compartment (divider can be removed if you want just one large inner compartment)
  • Two Dual-access side pockets (instead of reaching around to grab your bottle, you can grab it from the side too!)
  • Front Stash Pocket (perfect for that gear you need to get to fast - like a rain jacket)
  • Stow-on-the-go Trekking Pole Attachments (nice loops to put your poles in by your side while quickly doing something with your hands - saves having to put them away)

There are lots of other smaller features on this pack that I won't cover here but you can see in the videos above. Most of them are fairly standard (compression straps, hook points for gear etc).

Don't forget they also have a lifetime warranty should the backpack fail to endure what you put it through. And Ospreys are very serious about covering a warranty no matter where you are when it happens!​ So, don't be shy in contacting them.

If you want to check the current prices on Amazon, there are two buttons below.​

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